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Ten-Ball

Except when clearly contradicted by these additional rules, the General Rules of Pocket Billiards apply.

Ten Ball is a variation of Rotation in which a rack of just 10 object balls is employed as you will discern from the following rules, it is virtually the same
as Nine-Ball, but with the extra ball adding both additional difficulty and generally fewer balls being pocketed on the opening break (particularly the ball or game-ball.) Still, accomplished players turn it into a fast, action packed game!

An older version of the game of Ten Ball originated in France in the 1800's. French Ten Ball awards points for the balls pocketed. The first player to reach an agreed upon score (generally 100 points) wins the game. It can be easily be handicapped by spotting less skilled players with points at the beginning of the game. No points are awarded if a foul occurs during a shot that pockets ball and the opponent gets "cue ball in hand" after a foul. Any ball pocketed or flying off from the table is pocketed and stays down except for the ten ball. If it is knocked in during a legal shot and is not the last ball to go down, the player get the 10 points and the Ten Ball is spotted. The player to shot the ten ball in last breaks the next rack. The game is continued until one player reaches or exceeds 100 points.

French Ten Ball is an excellent group game because more than two or three people can play. It is a very social game.

PLAYERS

2 though 3, or 4 is generally preferred.

THE RACK

The rack is truncated by removal of the rear row of balls (rows 1-2-3-4) with the 1 on the foot spot, and the 10-ball in the center of the row-of-3 other balls be placed entirely at random.

OBJECT OF THE GAME

The player legally pocketing the 10-ball wins the game unless you are playing French rules.

For French Ten Ball, each has the point value of its number. Players get the point value of each ball legally pocketed when the balls are hit in rotation. These points are added and as many rotations or racks are played as needed for one of the players to reach the maximum required score.

BREAK

The starting player must either (1) make an open break, or (2) legally pocket an ball. If failing to do so, the incoming player has choice of (1) cue ball in behind the head string and object balls in position, or (2) having the balls racked and shooting the opening break shot

RULES OF PLAY:

1. A legal shot requires that the cue ball's first contact with a ball is with the lowest numbered ball on the table, and then either (1) pocket a numbered ball, or (2) cause the cue ball or any object ball to contact a cushion. Failure to meet this requirement is a foul.

2. A legally pocketed ball entities the shooter to remain at the table until failing to pocket a ball on a legal shot.

3. When a player legally pockets a ball, he must shoot again. The player may not call a safety and spot a legally pocketed ball.

4. It is a loss of the game if a player commits three successive fouls for American Ten Ball, no three foul rule exists for French Ten Ball.

ILLEGALLY POCKETED BALLS

All spotted, no penalty in American Ten Ball, stay down in French Ten Ball. (Common option, coin-operated play. None spotted except the game-ball, no penalty. If the 10 ball goes down early on a coin operated table, one of the other unused striped ball may be substituted for the fallen ten ball)

OBJECT BALLS JUMPED OFF THE TABLE

In American Ten Ball all spotted. In French Ten Ball is is pocketed. The stroke is a foul, and the incoming player has cue ball in hand. except after the break shot then the cue ball is placed in the kitchen.

CUE BALL AFTER JUMPING OFF THE TABLE OR SCRATCH

Incoming player has cue ball in hand, except after the break shot, then the cue ball is placed in the kitchen.

PENALTY FOR FOULS

Incoming player is awarded cue ball in hand. (Note: Rule of Play 4 calls for loss of game in American Ten Ball if the foul is a 3rd successive one.)


 

 

Cut-Throat

Except when clearly contradicted by these additional rules, the General Rules of Pocket Billiards apply.

TYPE OF GAME

Cut-Throat (also known as Elimination) is a very popular game in social situations, rather than for serious competitive play. It is very enjoyable to play - fast and with simple rules. A perfect game when an odd number of participants are available.

PLAYERS

3 or 5.

BALLS USED

Standard set of object balls 1- 15 plus cue ball.

THE RACK

Standard triangle rack with the I ball on the foot spot, and the 6 and I I balls on the two corners; all other balls placed at random.

DETERMINATION OF GROUPS

In three-player games, starting player has the group of balls 1-5; second 6-10, third player has balls 11- 15. In five-player games, starting player 1-3; second play er 4-6; third 7-9; fourth 10-12; and fifth 13-15.

OBJECT OF THE GAME

To legally pocket your opponents' balls before the opponents legally pocket your group of balls.

SCORING

Group balls have no point value. The player with a ball(s) still on the table, when all the other groups' balls are legally pocketed, wins the game.

OPENING BREAK

Starting player must make an open break. If failing to do so, incoming player may

1. accept the table in position and shoot, or;

2. require that the balls be reracked and shoot the opening break himself.
All balls pocketed on a legal break remain pocketed.

RULES OF PLAY

1. Players must decide prior to the game whether they are playing call shot or not.

2. A legal shot requires that the cue ball's first contact be with an opponents' t ball. On all shots, player must cause the cue ball to contact an object ball then either

(a) pocket a numbered ball, or
(b) cause any numbered ball or the cue ball to contact a cushion. Failure to
these requirements is a foul. Any legally pocketed ball entitles shooter to
continue at the table until failing to pocket an object ball on a shot. (Also see except Rule of Play 4.)

3. If player pockets any opponents' balls on an illegal shot, they are spotted; but pockets his own group balls on an illegal shot, they remain pocketed. If player pockets the last ball of his own group, whether or not a legal shot, it remains pocketed and his inning ends.

4. When a player's last group ball is legally pocketed, he is eliminated from the shooting rotation. He remains eliminated for the duration of the game unless a foul is committed by a player still in the game; when a player is reinstated due to a foul, he resumes his normal position in the original order of play.

5. When a player has the cue ball in hand behind the head string (as after a scratch), all balls of all opponents' groups are behind the head string, the object ball nearest the head string may, at the shooters request, be spotted on the foot spot. or more balls are an equal distance from the head string, the player may designate which of the equidistant balls he desires to be spotted.

6. When successive games are played, the order of play for the next game is the same as the order of final elimination in the preceding game. (First player eliminated breaks; winner shoots last, others in order of elimination.)

ILEGALLY POCKETED BALLS

Opponents group balls are spotted; no penalty. Shooter's group balls remain pocketed, no penalty.

OBJECT BALLS JUMPED OFF THE TABLE

All spotied. The stroke is a foul, and the penalty for fouls is followed. The ing player accepts the cue ball in position.

CUE BALL AFTER JUMPING OFF THE TABLE OR SCRATCH

Incoming player has cue ball in hand behind the head string.

PENALTY FOR FOULS

Shooter's inning ends. In addition, one ball from each of the opponents' groups is off the table is brought back into play. Players who had been eliminated
can be reinstated at any time until the game is over. If a player's group has no pocketed balls at the time of a foul by one of his opponents, then the penalty has no effect on that group or player; the penalty is not carried forward.


 

Cribbage

Except when clearly contradicted by these additional rules, the General Rules of Pocket Billiards Apply.

TYPE OF GAME

Cribbage Pocket Billiards derives its name from the fact that a score can be made (with two exceptions) only by pocketing two consecutive balls which add up to 15; a similarity exists with the popular card game of Cribbage. In a sense, it represents a combination of a call-shot game and a set-order game, and is a bit different and quite interesting to play.

PLAYERS

2 Players

BALLS USED

Standard set of object balls 1-15 plus cue ball.

THE RACK

Standard triangle rack, with the 15-ball in the center; with the exception that no two of the three corners shall add up to a total of 15 points, all other balls may be placed entirely at random.

OBJECT OF THE GAME

To score five points (cribbages) out of a possible total of eight.

DEFINITION OF A CRIBBAGE

A cribbage is a pair of object balls, legally pocketed, numerically totaling 15. There are just seven regular cribbages: 1-14, 2-13, 3-12, 4-11, 5-10, 6-9, and 7-8. No other ball combinations can be cribbages except that when all seven regular cribbages have been legally pocketed, the 15 ball becomes a legal cribbage by itself.

SCORING

Each leally pocketed cribbage counts one point for scoring player.

OPENING BREAK

Starting player must attempt an open break. Failure to do so is a breaking violation; opponent has the choice of:
1. requiring offending player to repeat the opening break (until the requirement is satisfied), or
2. playing the opening break shot. Starting player is not required to call the shot; if any balls are pocketed on the break shot, the accrue to him and he may continue at the table.

RULES OF PLAY

1. To legally pocket a cribbage, the two balls must be pocketed in the same inning When a player has legally pocketed a single ball on a shot, he must legally pocket the appropriate companion ball on his next shot, or it is a foul.

2. If a player scores a legal cribbage, he can continue his inning and attempt to score more cribbages in the same inning.

3. When not "on a cribbage", if a player pockets two or more balls on a shot that do not constitute a cribbage, he may next pocket any of the proper companion balls as he chooses, but must successively pocket each of those companion balls if he is to continue at the table. If he fails, it is a foul. If, while satisfying the requirements of scoring companion balls, other ball(s) are incidentally pocketed they likewise accrue to him; he must continue to complete one of the cribbage he is "on'' on each successive stroke (though in no special order). Failure to do is a foul; all balls of uncompleted cribbages are spotted.

4. When a ball is pocketed legally, but player fails to complete the cribbage
legally during the same inning, the ball is spotted.

5. On all shots, the player must cause the cue ball to contact an object ball and then either:
(a) pocket a numbered ball, or;
(b) cause any numbered ball or the cue ball to contact a cushion. Failure to do so is a foul.

6. A player loses the game if committing three successive fouls.

7. If the 15-ball is pocketed before all the other cribbages have been legally pocketed, it is an illegally pocketed ball and is spotted immediately following the stroke (not inning) on which it was pocketed. No penalty.

8. When a player has the cue ball in hand behind the head string (after a scratch) and all the object balls are all behind the head string, the object ball nearest the head string may be spotted on the foot spot at his request. If two or more balls are an equal distance from the head string, the player may also designate which of the equidistant balls should be spotted.

ILLEGALLY POCKETED BALLS

All spotted; no penalty.

OBJECT BALLS JUMPED OFF THE TABLE

All spotted. The stroke is a foul, and the penalty for fouls is followed.

CUE BALL AFTER JUMP OR SCRATCH

Incoming player has cue ball in hand behind the head string.

PENALTY FOR FOULS

Inning ends; no point or ball penalty (except per Rule of play 6). Incoming player has the option of:

1. accepting the table in position and shooting, or;
2. shooting with cue in hand behind the head string.


 

Bottle Pool

Except when clearly contradicted by additional rules, the General Rules of Pocket Billiards apply.

TYPE OF GAME

A unique pocket billiards game, Bottle Pool requires the use of an inexpensive but specially shaped and balance leather or plastic container ("bottle" or "shaker bottle"), shaped much like some disposable beverage bottles. The play of Bottle Pool combines the ball pocketing abilities of pocket billiards with the carom-making requirements of carom games.

PLAYERS

2 or more.

BALLS USED

Object balls 1 and 2, plus cue ball.

THE RACK

No triangle needed; at the start of the game, the 1-ball is frozen to the foot centered on the first diamond in from the racker's right corner pocket; the 2-ball is also frozen to the foot cushion, centered on the first diamond in from racker's left corner pocket; the bottle is placed open end down on the center spot.

OBJECT OF THE GAME

To score exactly 31 points prior to opponent(s).

SCORING

There are five scoring possibilities. Executing a legal stroke scores as follows:

1. Pocketing the 1-ball: one point.
2. Pocketing the 2-ball: two points.
3. Carom of the cue ball on the two object balls: one point.
4. Carom of the cue ball from an object ball(s) to the bottle which knocks the bottle onto its side: five points.
5. Carom of the cue ball from an object ball(s) to the bottle which stands the bottle onto its base: automatic win of the game.

Should a player accomplish more than one scoring possibility on a shot, he scores for each; a single shot can result in a total of nine points scored. Since exactly 31 must be scored for victory (unless #5 above applies), a player must not exceed 31; if he does, his inning ends and his score becomes only the total by which he exceeded 31.

OPENING BREAK

No "break shot" as such. Beginning with cue ball in hand behind the head string,
starting player must cause the cue ball to contact either the 1 ball or the 2-ball. If failing to do so, the incoming player can require that offending player repeat the opening shot until that requirement is satisfied.

RULES OF PLAY

1. A legally executed scoring stroke entities shooter to continue at the table until failing to legally score on a shot, exceeds 31 points on a shot, causes an object ball to contact the bottle before the cue ball contacts the bottle (the entire shot is invalid and the inning ends), or causes the bottle to be forced off the table or into a pocket (the entire shot is invalid and inning ends).

2. On all shots, player must cause the cue ball to contact an object ball. Failure to do so is a foul.

3. Cue ball must contact an object ball before it contacts the bottle. Failure to do so is a foul.

4. If player causes the bottle to be upset, or upended by an object ball, the shot is a foul.

5. Player loses the game if he fouls in each of three consecutive innings at the
table.

REPLACING UPSET BOTTLE

Whenever the bottle is upset, it is replaced on the table, open end down, with the open end as close as possible to its position when the bottle came to rest. It is, of course, replaced prior to the next shot.

When the bottle is forced off the table or into a pocket (or into such position that the open end is over the pocket opening, making replacement as in the preceding paragraph impossible), then bottle is replaced on the center spot. If occupied, then replace on the head spot; if occupied, use the foot spot; if occupied, hold out until the center spot is vacant.

ILLEGALLY POCKETED BALLS

All spotted. The stroke is a foul, and the penalty for fouls is followed.

OBJECT BALL JUMPED OFF THE TABLE

All spotted. The stroke is a foul, and the penalty for fouls is followed.

SPECIAL SPOTTING RULES

After each shot is completed, any pocketed object balls are spotted prior to the shot. They are spotted in the positions as at the start of the game. If a ball or bottle prevents the free placement of an object ball to be spotted, the object is spotted on the center spot; if that is also occupied, the object ball is then spotted on the head spot. If both object balls are being spotted, follow the above, first spotting the 1-ball, then the 2-ball.

CUE BALL AFTER JUMP OR SCRATCH

Incoming player has cue ball in hand behind the head string.

PENALTY FOR FOULS

One point is deducted from offender's score for each foul. Fouls other than cue jumped/scratched, incoming player accepts the cue ball in position.


 

 

Brazillian 8 Ball

Brazillian 8 Ball is played with the same rules as regular eight ball with one twist. After a player has a suite of balls (solids or stripped), and having played one inning with the suite of balls, the player may pocket a ball from the opposite suite and then proceed to play with the new suite of ball. His opponent must take his next complete turn or pocket at least one of the new suite balls before he can again change suites. It is a real game of strategy because a player can shoot all but one of his balls in and have his suite stolen by his opponent pocketing the one remaining ball and then going for the eight ball. This is a good leveler of abilities and often favors the player who can come up with the best strategy of defensive shooting. _


 

 

BCA Straight Pool

Except when clearly contradicted by these additional rules, the General Rules of Pocket Billiards apply.

6.1 OBJECT OF THE GAME

14.1 is a nomination game. The player must nominate a ball and a pocket. The player is awarded one point for every correctly nominated and pocketed ball on a legal stroke, and is allowed to continue a turn until failure to pocket a nominated ball or commits a foul. The player can pocket the first 14 balls, but before continuing a turn by shooting at the 15th (and last remaining) ball on the table, the 14 pocketed balls are racked as before, except with the apex space vacant. The player then attempts to pocket the 15th ball in a manner so that the racked balls are disturbed and he can continue the run. The player who scores the predetermined point total for a game (usually 150 in major tournament play or any agreed upon total in casual play) prior to the opponent, wins the game.

6.2 PLAYERS

2, or 2 teams.

6.3 BALLS USED

Standard set of object balls numbered 1-15, plus the cue ball.

6.4 THE RACK

Standard triangle rack with the apex ball on the foot spot, 1-ball on the racker'_s right corner, 5-ball on left corner. Other balls are placed at random and must touch their neighbors.

6.5 SCORING

Any ball legally pocketed counts one point for the shooter.

6.6 OPENING BREAK

Starting player must either (1) designate a ball and a pocket into which that ball will be pocketed and accomplish the shot, or (2) cause the cue ball to contact a ball and then a cushion, plus cause two object balls to contact a cushion. Failure to meet at least one of the above requirements is a breaking violation. Offender'_ score is assessed a 2-point penalty for each breaking violation. In addition, the opponent has the choice of (1) accepting the table in position, or (2) having the balls re-racked and requiring the offending player to repeat the opening break. That choice continues until the opening break is not a breaking violation, or until the opponent accepts the table in position. The three successive fouls rule does not apply to breaking violations. If the starting player scratches on a legal opening break, he is charged with a foul and assessed a one point penalty, which applies toward the "_uccessive Fouls Penalties."_The incoming player is awarded cue ball in hand behind the head string, with object balls in position.

6.7 RULES OF PLAY

1. A legally pocketed ball entitles a shooter to continue at the table until he fails to legally pocket a called ball on a shot. A player may shoot any ball, but before the shot, must designate the called ball and called pocket. Details such as kisses, caroms, combinations or cushions (all of which are legal) need not be indicated. Any additionally pocketed ball(s) on a legal stroke is scored as one point for the shooter.

2. On all shots, a player must cause the cue ball to contact an object ball and then (1) pocket a numbered ball, or (2) cause the cue ball or any numbered ball to contact a cushion. Failure to meet these requirements is a foul. When an object ball is not frozen to a cushion, but is within a ball'_ width of a cushion (referee to determine by measurement if necessary), a player is permitted only two consecutive legal safeties on that ball using only the near rail. If such safety play is employed, that object ball is then considered frozen to the rail on the player'_ next inning. The General Rules of Pocket Billiards "_Frozen Balls"_requirements apply if the player chooses to make the first cue ball contact with that object ball on the third shot. (Note: If a player has committed a foul on the shot immediately before or the shot immediately after playing this ball, then he must immediately meet the requirements of the "_rozen Ball"_rule when playing this object ball. Also, if he has committed two consecutive fouls, he must immediately meet the requirements of the Frozen Ball rule when playing this object ball. If such player fails to meet the requirements of the Frozen Ball rule, he is considered to have committed a third successive foul and the appropriate point penalty is assessed as well as one point for each of the previous fouls. All 15 balls are then re-racked and the player committing the infraction is required to break, as at the beginning of the game.)

3. When the 14th ball of a rack is pocketed, play stops momentarily with the 15th ball remaining in position on the table; the 14 pocketed balls are then racked (with the space at the foot spot vacant in the triangle). Player then continues, normally pocketing the 15th (or "_reak"_ball) in such a manner as to have the cue ball carom into the rack and spread the balls to facilitate the continuance of his run. However, player is not compelled to shoot the 15th ball; he may shoot any ball he desires. See Diagram 22 if the 15th ball is pocketed on the same stroke as the 14th ball.

15th ball lies /Cue ball lies

In the Rack

Not in the Rack and not on the Head Spot*

On The Head Spot*

In The Rack

15th ball: foot spot
Cue Ball: in kitchen
15th ball: head spot
Cue Ball: in position 15th ball: center spot
Cue Ball: in position
Pocketed

15th ball: foot spot
Cue Ball: in kitchen 15th ball: foot spot
Cue Ball: in position 15th ball: foot spot
Cue Ball: in position
Behind Head String, But not on Head Spot

15th ball: in position
Cue Ball: head spot
Not behind Head String, and not in the Rack
15th ball: in position
Cue Ball: in kitchen
On Head Spot


15th ball: in position

Cue Ball: center spot *on spot means to interfere with spotting a ball on the head spot


4. A player may call a safety rather than an object ball (for defensive purposes). Safety play is legal, but must comply with all applicable rules. The player'_ inning ends when a safety is played, and pocketed balls are not scored. Any object ball pocketed on a called safety is spotted.

5. A player may not catch, touch or in any way interfere with a ball as it travels toward a pocket or the rack area on a shot (to include catching a ball as it enters a pocket by having a hand in the ball as it enters a pocket by having a hand in the pocket). Doing so is a special "
eliberate foul"_and is penalized one point for the foul and an additional 15 point penalty, for a total of 16 points. The incoming player then has choice of (1) accepting the table in position with the cue ball in hand behind the head string, or (2) having all 15 balls re-racked and requiring the offending player to shoot under the requirements of the opening break.

6. If the 15th (un-pocketed) ball of a rack and/or the cue ball interferes with the triangle being lowered straight down into position for racking, refer to the diagram, which indicates the proper manner of relocating balls. (The gray boxes are those situations in which there is no interference, both balls remain in position.)

7. When a player has the cue ball in hand behind the head string (as after a scratch) and all the object balls are behind the head string, the object ball nearest the head string may be spotted upon request. If two or more balls are an equal distance from the head string, the player may designate which of the equidistant balls is to be spotted.

6.8 ILLEGALLY POCKETED BALLS

All spotted. No penalty.

6.9 OBJECT BALLS JUMPED OFF THE TABLE

The stroke is a foul. Any jumped ball(s) is spotted after the balls come to rest.

6.10 CUE BALL AFTER JUMPING OFF TABLE/SCRATCH

Incoming player has cue ball in hand behind the head string, unless the provision of Rule of Play 6.7.2, 6.7.5 or 6.12 (below) apply to the offender'_ foul and dictate alternate choices or procedures.

6.11 PENALTIES FOR FOULS

One point deducted for each foul. Note: penalties are more severe for deliberate fouls (Rule of Play 6.7.5) and third "_uccessive Fouls"_(6.12 below). Incoming player accepts cue ball in position unless foul was a jumped cue ball, pocket scratch, deliberate foul (Rule of Play 6.7.5) or third successive foul.

6.12 SUCCESSIVE FOUL PENALTIES

When a player commits a foul, penalization is one point (or more as appropriate) and a notation is made and posted by the scorer that the player is "_n a foul."_The player remains "_n a foul"_until the next shot attempt, at which time the foul may be removed by successfully pocketing a called ball, or completing a legal safety. If failing to meet these requirements on the next turn at the table, the player is penalized one point. The notation is changed to "_on two fouls."_If he fails to meet the requirements of successfully pocketing a called ball or completing a legal safety on the third consecutive turn at the table, penalization is one point and an additional penalty of 15 points is assessed (a total of 18 points for three consecutive fouls equals -18 points). The commission of a third successive foul automatically clears the offender'_ record of fouls. "_he incoming player has the choice of 1). accepting the balls in position, or 2). having all 15 balls re-racked and requiring the offending player to shoot under the requirements of the opening break. Rules for the opening break apply."_It should be emphasized that successive fouls must be committed in successive turns (or playing attempts), not merely in successive innings. For example, if a player ends inning six with a foul, steps to the table for inning seven and fouls (he is "_n two fouls"_, and then starts inning eight with a legally pocketed ball before scratching on his second shot attempt of the inning, he has not committed three successive fouls, even though there were fouls in three successive innings. As soon as he legally pocketed the ball to start inning eight, he cleared the two fouls. He is, of course, "_n one foul"_ when he plays the first stroke attempt of inning nine.

6.13 SCORING NOTE

The deduction of penalty points can result in negative scores. A running score can read "_inus one,"_"_inus two,"_"_inus 15,"_etc. (A player can win a game with a score of 150 while the opponent has scored but two fouls. The final score would read 150 to -2.) If a player fouls on a shot that has not pocketed a ball, the point penalty is deducted from his score at the end of the previous inning. If a player fouls and pockets a ball on the same shot, that ball is spotted (not scored) and the point penalty is deducted from his score at the end of the previous inning._

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